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ALVANI 
^REPORT 






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•RVBLISHEPBy-THEALVANI A550CtATIoAIOF' 
THEPHIUPELPHIA 

^^. PUBLICATION OFFICE^ 

VOL. XXXVI. 



Editoriai. : 

The American Journal of Pharmacy. 
The February Social Meeting. 

Pharmackuticai, Meeting : 

Address: "Immunity; What is it and upon What Does 

It Depend?" By Dr. Joseph McFarland. 
Bismuth Salicylate, Basic Syrups. 
Notes on Beeswax, 
Fresh Vanilla. 
Commercial Arrowroots. 

Executive Board Meeting. 
Papers : 

Report of Committee on Nominations for looo-oi, Alumni 

Association, P. C. P. 
The Philadelphia Association of Retail Druggists' Euchre 

and Dance. 
A \^sit to the Bacteriologic Laboratory of the H. K 

Mulford Co. By A. Fabian and W. H. Guest. 

Our Graduates. 
Ci,Ass News. 
Items. 



price : one doUar, each year, in advance. Issued monthly. Sub- 
scriptions datelfrom the January issue. Single numbers, ten cents 

Address all matter for publication to the Editor, Joseph W. England 
145 North Tenth Street, and all bnsinew matters to the Busines^ 
Manager, Wm. Nelson Stem, 145 North Tenth Street, Philadelphia. 



E. FOUGERA & CO. 

"^6, 28, 30 N. William St., NEW YORK 
IMPORTERS OF FRENCH AND ENGLISH 

Medicinal Preparations 

BEETHAM'S LAIT LAROLA MONTEIGNET'S CAPSULES, SYRUP AND TROCHES 

BETUL-OL MORSON'S KREOSOTE 

BROU'S INJECTION PAUTAUBERGE'S SOLUTION 

CHANTEAUD'S SEDLITZ PESQUI'S WINE AND LE SANATOR 

CHAPOTEAUT'S PREPARATIONS PRICE'S GLYCERINE 

COLCHI-SAL (Colchicine Salicylate) NOURRY'S lODINATED WINE 

FILTERING PAPER, PRAT DUMAS REYNOLD'S SPECIFIC 

FRUNEAU'S PAPER SELTZOGENES, ALL SIZES 

GUILLIE'S ELIXIR TAMAR INDIEN 

"MENE" SANITARY TOWELS TEYSSEDRE'S SYRUP 



PRUNIER'S HYPERPHOSPHINE 

Granulated, Syrup and Wafer-Cachets. 

HENRY K. WAMPOLE & CO. 

Originators and ilanufacturers of 

WAMPOLE'S 

Perfected and Tasteless Preparation of the Extract of 

COD LIVER OIL 

We are now prepared to furnish SOIvUBLE AND ELASTIC GELATIN CAPSULES, in 
•which are contained the more popular and frequently prescribed combinations of those remedies 
■whose physical properties are such as to make their administration preferable in this form. 

For the manufacture of these products we have equipped a special department in our 
Laboratory with the most modern apparatus and machinery, which is in charge of a 
thoroughly experienced chemist, who gives the closest attention to each and every detail of the 
various processes from start to finish. 

We would call especial attention to Capsules of Methylene Blue Comp., of the following 
formula : 

Methylene Blue i gr- 

Oil of Sandal Wood i^ gtt. 

Oleoresin of Copaiba i% gtt. 

Oil of Cinnamon % gtt. 

Oil of Nutmeg % gtt. 

These have, after the most varied and rigid clinical tests, proved of exceptional value in the treat- 
ment of all stages of acute gonorrhoea and gleet. 

Samples of and descriptive literature on the above, as well as any of our products, will be 
gladly furnished on request. 

HENRY K. WAMPOLE & CO., Manufacturing Chemists 
PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 



AL VMNI REPOR T, \ 

FEBRUARY, 1900. 



The Retail Druggist 
Who Keeps a ''Pharmacy" 

makes his own preparations and also makes more 
money than the one who thinks the " easiest way is 
the best," and dilutes Fluid Extracts and calls them 
Tinctures. 

The formulae for making Tinctures are distinctly 
expressed in the Pharmacopoeia and should be fol- 
lowed if their products are to be legitimately called 
" Tinctures." The cut-rate and department stores are 
absorbing the sale of patent medicines, and the druggist 
must look to his profession for profit, and, instead of 
maintaining large manufacturing establishments for 
others, have a small, profitable one of his own. 

Send Jor Price- List and Foimulaty 



GILPIN, LANGDON & CO. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
JKBRUARV, i^oo. 



DRUG LABELS... 



FOLDING PAPER BOXES 
PILL AND POWDER BOXES 
AND OTHER SPECIALTIES 





Printed and Lithographed — can be had 
in gcx)d style and at low prices from the 
old-established Label Printing House of 

DAVE) Heston & Sons, 



CATALOGUE SENT ON REQUEST 
OR REPRESENTATIVE WILL CALL 



FRANKFORD, PHILADA. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 



Philadelphid Association of Retail Druggists 

The next regular meeting of the Philadelphia Association of Retail 
Druggists will be held at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacj', 145 North 
Tenth Street, Friday, March 2d, 1900, 3 P.M. 

"Sunday Closing " will be up for discussion and action. 

All retail druggists, whether members of our Association or not, are 
invited to attend, as this will be an unusually important meeting. 

WM. McINTYRE, President. W. A. RUMSEY, Secretary. 

JAMES C. PERRY, Chairman Executive Committee. 



.^i^;$j$j$l$i^j$j$i^i^l^j^l$j$i^j^l^i^i^^j$j&;&j&: 






Gaduol 



(Ale Ell Cod-Liver Oil, MERCK) 



Contains the alterative constituenls of the oil without 
the fatty matter. Merck's Digest No. 4 presents 
formulas for palatable mixtures of Gaduol. 



Cannalbin 



Albuminate Ex 



Anti diarrheal. Free from the usual disadvantages 
of lead, bismuth, and silver salts. May be had as 
powder or in 5 grn. tablets. 



I Tcbtbalbin 



(Ictatb;ol Albuminate, KNOLL) 



.\\\ odorless and almost tasteless powder. Employed 
instead of ichthyol wherever the latter is indicated 
internally. Two forms: Powder and 5 gm. tablets. 



Cargin 



(SilverProtalbin. LILIEXFELD) 



Bactericide and astringent ; used in gonorrhea and in- 
fectious eye diseases. Largin contains 11. iS of silver. 



4^ 
4> 

/IS 
4S 

4> 

% 

k MERCK & CO. 

<IS 



aftonifird Coal-t 



CREOLIN-PEARSON -; 

THE IDEAL DISINFECTANT, DEODORANT, 
AND GERM DESTROYER. 
\\'indo-M advertising atid booklets free on request. 



Cbiocol 



(Cuaiacol-iulpboDate of PotASsitim, ROCHE) 






A water-soluble form of gualacol. According to the 
U. S. Dispensatory (i8th ed.. p. 1675), guaiacol acts 
'"by forming compounds in the blood with the toxic 
by-products of the tubercle bacillus and aiding their 
elimination." 

Thiocol is employed in phthisis, chronic coughs, 
and chronic catarrhs of the gastro-intestinal and 
genito. urinary tracts. Three forms of Thiocol are on 
the market: Powder; 5 grn. Tablets; and Syrup 
(with working formula on every label) containing 
5 grn. Thiocol in a fluid dram. 



Dionin 



(Ethjlmorphlne Hjdrochlorate, .MERCK) 



Cough sedative, antispasmodic, and analgesic. Pre- 
scribed in the treatment of bronchial and phthisical 
coughs, and for combating pain in gynecological 
cases ; also in chronic morphinism. Dionin may be 
had in powder form or in J4 £■''>• tablets. 



Orexine Cannate 



An efficient appetizer and gastric tonic. Orexoids 
(4 grn. tablets of Orexine Tannate under the label 
of Merck ifc Co.) are on the market as well as the 
powder form. 



NEW YORK I 



LITERATURE ON REQUEST 



UNIVERSITY PLACE 



'^•S$i$i$:$!$;$;$$;^$;$;$!$:$;$:$iS$$!$;$!$€$;^$;^$;^^$$^$;$!^^$!$$!$^$;$^$!^:$: ^:^ :$!$;$!^$$$i$;fe 



ALUMXI REPOR T, {{{ — 

FEBRUARY, 19'JO. 




For they are tested by us on the living 
animal, and their efficacy established be- 
yond all doubt. Ours is the only House 
in the country that maintains a laboratory 
equipped for the especial purpose of test- 
ing drugs physiologically. All drugs not 
amenable to chemical assay, such as aco- 
nite, cannabis mdica, convallaria, digitalis, 
ergot, elaterium, strophanthus, and other 
toxic and narcotic agents, are submitted 
to a careful physiological test before they 
leave our laboratory. ." .' ." .* .' .* .* 
if you want fluid extracts that have 
been standardized and their reliability 
determined beyond all question, specify 
P., D. & Co., and you will get them. .* 



PARKE, DAVIS & CO., 

Home Offices and Laboratories, 

Branches in New York, Kansas npTDOITT MI^H 

City, Baltimore, New Orleans, and ^*^ * ^^*^ * ' iVll^O, 

Montreal, Quebec. 

BRANCH LABORATORIES: 

London, England, and Waikerville, Ontario. 



IV — 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEriRVARV, 1900., 



The"EUREKA'TabletMachine 

DON'T THROW AWAY MONEY ON A 

CHEAP TABLET MACHINE . . . 
Buy the 

"EUREKA " with three sets of dies for $25.00 

It will compress 100 tablets a minute — any size up to J inch 

WKITE FOR PARTICULARS 

F. J. STOKES MACHINE CO. 

13tli and Noble Sts., Philadelphia 

Write for our Catalogue of Power Machines. 




ALUHNI SOCIAL MEETING. 

THE next Social Meeting of the Alumni Association of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy will be held on Tuesday 
evening, February 20, 19C0, at 145 North Tenth Street, this city. 
You are cordially invited io be present. 

Committee on Social Meetings. 



SUPPOSITORY MOULDS, ETC. 



aririrTJTj-u-Lnj-LrvrLr 
\ RECTUM SUP 




SUPPOSITORY MOULDS, 
best white metal, 10, 15 or 30 grains. 
Trays to hold 6 and 12 moulds, tin. 

VAGINAL SUPPOSITORY MOULDS, 

best white metal. Tray to hold 6 and 12 
moulds, tin. 

RECTUM SUPPOSITORY MOULDS, 
^ brass, two sizes. To make 6 or 12. 



VAGINAL SUPPOSITORY MOULDS, ^ 

brass. To make 6 and 12. ^ 

MOULDS for Gelatin Bougies. ^ 

Camphor Ice. ■^ 

Cosmetics— all sizes and shapes. s 

Caustic. 5 

Pastilles. S 

PUNCHES for lozenges— all shapes. 



• jT_n_n_n_run_n_n.j 



.n_n_rt 

AT T \ A/ T t? 7 Manufacturer of Metal Goods for the Trade, 
. n. VV \\\L^ No. 917 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



AL UMNI REPOR T, 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



V 



No. 1. W., T. & CO. NEBULIZER, 



PATENT APPLIED FOR. 



Metal parts are all nickel-plated and polished. 

Bottle and globe are of glass. 
Removable Hard Rubber Throat and Nasal Tips. 

This Instrument will produce a vapor much 
finer than the spray obtainable from the best class 
of Atomizers. 

The Nebulizer will be found invaluable where 
a very fine subdivision of medicated oil is necessary. 

Each in handsome paper box . . |iS.oo per dozen. 

Discount to the Trade, 
40 and 10 Per Cent. 





No. 35. 

W., T. & CO. 

OIL ATOMIZER. 

Detachable Throat and Nasal Tubes of Metal. 

Price |i2.oo per dozen. 

Discount to the Trade, 
40 and 10 Per Cent. 



WHITALL, TATUM & CO. 



Manufacturers of 



Druggists', Chemists' and Perfumers' Glassware. 

Manufacturers, Importers and Jobbers of 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 



PHILADELPHIA, 
410-416 Race Street. 



NEW YORK, 
46 and 48 Barclay St. 



BOSTON, 
41 and 43 Broad St. 



A full line of samples of our goods can be seen at our 
Chicago Salesroom, No. 196 East Randolph Street. 



Vi AL UMNI RKPOR T, 

FEBRUARY 1900. 

. . ESTABLISHED 1837 . . 

Robert Shoemaker & Co. 



4 



th and Race Sts. .. ^[""S Millers, 

Philadelphia. , j^ 

and Druggists 



We offer to the Retail Drug Trade Ground and Powdered Drugs of Absolute 

Purity. Each crude drug employed is selected with the greatest care and is of 
the best quality. 

Shoemaker's Powdered Vanilla, 

Made from TRUE MEXICAN Vanilla Beans— 50 per cent. Sugar. 
FOR MAKING FLAVORING EXTRACT. 

Convenient and economical. In one-pound Tins. One pound will make one 
gallon of Extract, unsurpassed for flavor and color. 



We are Manufacturing 

Compressed Tablets and Lozenges. 

THEY ARE UNIFORM IN SIZE AND ELEGANT 
IN APPEARANCE. 



Ground Oxide of Zinc, 

We originated the grinding of Oxide of Zinc in Oil, for the U. S. P. 

Ointment. 

We use the finest quality of Oxide of Zinc, and Grind it in French Oil of 

Sesame Benzoinated. 

Formula for the U. S. P. Ointment with our Zinc will be found on each label. 
Price, per pound, including covered jar, 50 cents. 



ROBERT SHOEMAKER & CO. 

Fourth and Race Streets. PHILADELPHIA. 




PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE 
PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 



VOL XXXVI. 



FEBRUARY, 1900 



No. 2 



Ebitorials- 

THE "AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHARMACY." 



When a technical pubHcation Uves for 
more than threescore years and ten, and, in 
these days of keen competition, is as vig- 
orous and aggressive as it ever was, there 
must be something of much more than 
usual merit in the publication. Such a jour- 
nal is the American Jourrial of Pharmacy , 
whose pages embrace largely the history of 
original research in American pharmacy, and 
whose contributors in the past have been 
the brightest writers in American pharma- 
ceutical literature. To-day, under the able 
direction of our fellow-alumnus, Henry 
Kraemer, '89, the Journal promises mucli 
for the future, every endeavor being made 
to bring together in it all that is best 
in pharmaceutical thought and practice. 

As an indication of the variety of subject- 
matter it presents, the following table of con- 



tents from the current issue of fifty reading 
pages is of interest : 

The Drug and Herb Vendors of the Sidewalks of 
Philadelphia. By Charles H. La Wall. 

Bismuih Salicylate, Basic. By Lyman F. Kebler. 
Syrupus Aurantii. By F. W. Haussmann. 
Syrupus Pruni Virginianae. By F. W. Haussmann. 
Syrupus Ro^ae. By F. W. Haussmann. 
Notes on Beeswav. By H. V. Arny. 
Recent Literature Relating to Pharmacy. 
Editorial — Micro-organisms and Disease. 
RevieAs and Bibliographical Notices. 
Editorial Notes and Comments. 
American Pharmaceutical Association. 
Minutes of the College Meeting. 
Minutes of the Phiirmaceutical Meeting. 
Notes and News. 

The American Journal oj Pharmacy should 
appeal especially to the graduates of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, not only 



PHARMA CE UTICAL MEE TING. 



ALUMNI RE FOR T, 
FEBRUARY, i</m. 



in the sending of original papers embodying 
research work for publication, but also in the 
sending of subscriptions. We earnestly urge 
the over 4,000 graduates of the College to 
help the Journal by subscribing and work- 
ing for it. If the practice of pharmacy is 



going to be uplifted and made more of a 
profession than it is, it must be done through 
the development of its scientific side, and in 
this field the /(j/zrwa/ stands supreme among 
pharmaceutical publications. Now is the 
time to subscribe. 



THE FEBRUARY SOCIAL MEETING. 



The Social. Meeting of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy held last month, as well as those 
previously held, was very successful, and 
reflects much credit upon the Committee 
on Social Meetings of fhe Alumni Associa- 
tion, and also upon the several class organi- 
zations of the College who have been asso- 
ciated with the Alumni Committee in the 
work, and have rendered yeoman service. 
These functions are now practically con- 
ducted by the students themselves, the dif- 



ferent classes taking their turns at doing the 
honors. At the Social Meeting of this month, 
which will be held on Tuesday evening, Feb- 
ruary 20, at the College, the Beta Phi So- 
ciety of the Second Year Class of the Col- 
lege will have charge, and, as it is the last 
Social Meeting of the series of 1899-1900, 
it goes witliout saying that every endeavor 
will be made to have it the most successful 
one yet held. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to all students, alumni and pharma- 
cists generally to be present. 



Ipbarmaceutical fll>eetinG, 



The fourth stated Pharmaceutical Meeting 
of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy for 
1899-1900 was held Tuesday, January 16, 
1900. William Mclntyre, President of the 
Philadelphia Association of Retail Drug- 
gists, presided. 

Prof. Joseph McFarland, of Philadelphia, 
widely known for his work in bacteriology, 
made a most interesting address upon the 
subject of " Immunity, What is It, and Upon 
What Does it Depend ?" 

The speaker defined the term immunity, 
as generally used, to mean resistance to 
disease, and divided his subject-matter into 
two headings : (i) Immunity to infection 
and (2) immunity to intoxication. He 
thought that the most important factors in- 
volved in producing infection were: (i) The 
kinds of bacteria, (2) the number of bacteria, 
(3) the avenue of entrance and (4) the kind 
of soil. Immunity to infection he divided 



into active and passive, the former being 
due to the natural powers of the individual 
and the latter to artificial means. A state- 
ment of the different theories held was then 
given regarding the nature of immunity. 

The address was then discussed. 

Prof. J. P. Remington inquired whether or 
not immunity could be transferred through 
heredity, making reference to protective 
mimicry. 

Dr. C- B. Lowe referred to the immunity of 
young infants as possibly due to the influ- 
ence of heredity. 

In reply, Professor McFarland said that 
acquired immunity was not hereditary. 

Replying to an inquiry made by J. W. 
England, as to the chemical nature of the 
antitoxins, whether or not they were proteid 
or nucleo-proteid in character, the speaker 
said that some workers regarded antitoxins 
as proteid substances, some believed them 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING. 



23 



to be forces and some ferments. Their 
exact chemical nature was a very difficult 
matter to ascertain. 

Lyman V. Kebler presented a paper on 
" Bismuth Salicylate, Basic," which has been 
printed in full in the current issue of the 
American Journal of Pharmacy (p. 65). Mr. 
Kebler does not believe that, practically, 
BiONOj.H.O exists. 

Mr. England asked a series ol questions, to 
which Mr. Kebler replied by saying that he 
had not been able to make satisfactory acid 
bismuth salicylate, that it was difficult to de- 
termine the percentage of tree salicylic acid 
in the basic salicylate, as the addition of alco- 
hol liberates free acid, and that the best 
method for determining the amount of nitrate 
in bismuth salicylate was, in his opinion, the 
Kjeldahl method. 

F. W. Haussmann, who has been working 
for some time, as a member of Research Com- 
mittee E of the U. S. Pharmacopoeia, upon 
the subject of "Syrups," presented a very 
interesting paper upon certain official syrups 
(see America7i Jo^crnal of Pharmacy , Feb. , 
1900, pp. 69-73). 



Edwin M. Boring, commenting upon the 
formula for syrup of orange, said that the more 
clear the syrup was, the less flavor it had. 
He prepared his syrup by triturating the fresh 
orange peel with sugar in a mortar, and 
adding (as well as water) the juice of the 
fruit, one orange being used to one pint of 
syrup. 

A valuable paper by Dr. H. V. Arny, en- 
titled "Notes on Beeswax," was read by 
Henry Kraemer (see A. J. P., 1900, 73). 

Mr. England presented, on behalf of Geo. 
M. Beringer, a specimen of fresh, uncured 
vanilla bean, obtained from Messrs. Dodge 
& Olcott, of New York. 

Professor Kraemer exhibited some inter- 
esting samples of commercial arrowroots, 
after which the meeting adjourned. 

The next Pharmaceutical Meeting of the 
present series will be held on Tuesday after- 
noon, February 20, 1900, at 145 N. Tenth 
Street. Papers will be read on : " Mineral 
Tannage," by Prof. S. P. Sadtler. " Soluble 
Ferric Pyrophosphate," by W. E. Ridenour, 
Ph.G. "Crocus and Some of Its Adulter- 
ants," by William Stair Weakley, P. D. 



Ejrecutive Boarb fIDeeting* 



The third stated meeting of the Executive 
Board of the Alumni Association of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy for 1899- 
1900 was held in the Library of the College 
on Thursday afternoon, December 7, 1899, 
President F. Wm. E. Stedem in the chair. 

The following members were present : 

F. Wm. E. Stedem, Theo. Campbell, Cor- 
nelius E. Spenceley, Wm. Lincoln Cliffe,Wm. 
E. Krewson, John H. Hahn, Dr. J. Louis 
D. Morison, David H. Ross, Albert Oetin- 
ger, Harry L. Stiles, Jos. W. England, Wm. 

G. Nebig, Frank P. Streeper, F.Wm. Hauss- 
mann and Walter A. Rumsey. 

Communications were received from Wm. 
N. Stem and John D. Burg, regretting in- 
ability to attend the meeting. 



The following ex-Presidents were also 
present : Thos. S. Wiegand, Dr. Charles A. 
Weidemann, Dr. Clement B. Lowe, Wallace 
Procter and James C. Perry. 

On motion, the reading of the minutes 
of the previous meeting was dispensed with. 

The following report of the Committee on 
Class Organization was read, and, on mo- 
tion, accepted : 

To the Executive Board, Alumni Associa- 
tion, P.C.P. 
Gentlemen:— The Committee on "Class 

Societies " and their Organization is pleased 

to report as follows : 

The third year class society (Zeta Phi) was 

organized with seventy-five members, and 

elected the following officers : 



24 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
I'EKRUARY, 1900. 



President, Harry Lionel Meredith, Hagers- 
town, Md. ; Vice-President, Wm. Samuel 
Stinson, Titusville, Pa. ; Secretary, Carlton 
Pierce Sunday, York, Pa. ; Treasurer, Louis 
Stolz, Syracuse, N.Y.; Class Reporters, Rob- 
ert Clayton Pursel, Bloomsburg, Pa. , Walter 
Brooks, Quarry ville, Pa.; Executive Com- 
mittee, Levi Scott, Camden, Del.; Henry 
James Garritt, Huron, O. ; Frank Casper 
Schad, Tamaqua, Pa.; Harry Wilbert Huglies, 
Millville, N. J.; Wm. Thomas McElwain, 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

The second year class society (Beta Phi) 
was organized with thirteen members. The 
following officers were elected : 

President — Rolland Hall French, Salem, O. 

Vice-President — Fielding Otis Lewis, Hib- 
bardsville, Ky. 

Secretary — Victor Clyde Michels, Albion, 
111. 

Treasurer — John Hartranft Levering, Nor- 
ristown, Pa. 

Class Reporters — E. Franklin Weaver 
Garber, Mt. Joy, Pa., and Earl Hobart Cone, 
Batavia, N. Y. 

Executive Committee — William Conrad 
Wolfer, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Hugh Boleyn 
Sprague, Salt Lake City, Utah ; Wm. For- 
saith Steever, Millersburg, Pa.; Jacob Syl- 
vester Picking, Jr., Somerset, Pa.; Clarence 
Eugene Shafer, Altoona, Pa. 

The first year class society (Alpha Phi) 
was organized with seventy-nine members. 
The following officers were elected : 

President — Edwin Clarence Zinn, Carlisle, 
Pa. 

Vice-President — Miss Edith Morton Good- 
man, Denver, Col. 

Secretary — Miss Theressa V. Donoghue, 
Girardville, Pa. 

Treasurer — James Heber Parker, Reading, 
Pa. 

Class Reporters — Charles Edward Martin, 
Columbia, Pa.; John Albert Dufford, West 
Sunbury, Pa. 

Executive Committee — Frank Hall Kirk, 
Curwensville, Pa. ; Wm. Brown Ackerman, 
East Mauch Chunk, Pa. ; John M. Toulson, 



Caden, Lexington, Ky. ; Mrs. Fannie Bez- 
man Margolin, Philadelphia, and Miss Anna 
R. Lescure, Philadelphia. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fkank G. Rv.\n, 

Chairman. 
Philadelphia, November 24, i8gg. 

The Secretary reported that he had col- 
lected and paid over to the Treasurer since 
the previous meeting of the Executive Board, 
$12.00 for badges and $5.00 for membership 
fee. 

The Business Manager of the Report re- 
ported that he had paid over to the Treas- 
urer since the previous meeting $216.09. 

The Treasurer reported that the balance 
in treasury at previous report was $90.02 ; 
receipts from all sources were $53309 ; orders 
paid amounted to $464.55, and balance in 
treasury was $158.56. 

On motion, the reports of the Secretary, 
Business Manager of the Report, and the 
Treasurer were accepted and ordered spread 
upon the minutes. 

The Finance Committee reported that 
they had approved of bills amounting to 
$634.15, of which amount $464.55 has been 
paid, leaving bills approved which were not 
paid, $169.60 ; also reported that the Treas- 
urer had a balance at previous meeting of 
$90.02, that he has secured from all sources 
$533.09,. and that orders have been paid 
amounting to $464.55, leaving a balance of 
$158.56. 

The Secretary stated that the following 
members had made application and procured 
the Alumni Badge : John H. Eppley, '92, 
Cassopolis, Cass County, Michigan ; How- 
ard Simes Hance, '99, 307 North Sixty-fifth 
Street, Philadelphia ; also that the following 
application for membership had been re- 
ceived : Edward A. Cornell, '65, Williams- 
port, Pa. 

The Secretary also read the following let- 
ter, which accompanied the application : 

Wm. E. Krewson, Secretary. 
Dear Sir: — Enclosed find cash for certifi- 



Chestertown, Md. ; Miss Alice Beatrice cate of Alumni. I have waited many years 



ALUMNI REPOR T, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING. 



25 



to connect myself more closely to my Alma 
Mater, appreciating in the meantime the 
good work that has been done. 

The Report has been a constant reminder 
of my remissness toward the College, and 
I trust she may have greater renown and 
prosperity in the future than the past. 
Yours truly, 

E. A. Cornell, '65. 
Williamsport , Pa., November 16, i8gg. 

The Committee on Revision of the By- 
Laws reported progress. 

The Committee on Publication reported 
that the Committee had awarded the contract 
for the paper to Irwin N. Megargee & Co. 
for the ensuing year, at a higher price than 
in 1899, as paper had advanced in price.; 
also, that they had given the contract for 
printing the Alumni Report for 1900 to 
Edward Stern & Co. , at the same figures as 
in 1899. 

On motion, these actions were sustained. 

James C. Perry reported that 127 Re- 
ports for the month of November had been 
sent out to members of the Philadelphia 
Association of Retail Druggists who were 
not graduates of our College, and stated 
that the Philadelphia Association of Retail 
Druggists desired to pay the Alumni Asso- 
ciation for the Reports, and that the As- 
sociation would like to use the columns of 
the Alumni Report each month and have 
it sent to their membership if possible. 

On motion, the matter was referred to the 
Committee on Publication, with power to act. 

On motion of Wm. G. Nebig, it was di- 
rected that the November and December 
issues of the Report sent to the members 
of the Philadelphia Association of Retail 
Druggists be donated to that Association 
for those two months. 

Wm. G. Nebig, of the Committee on 
Social Meetings, announced that the Octo- 
ber and November Social Meetings had been 
held, and were very successful and enjoy- 
able affairs, and that the December meeting 
would be held on Tuesday evening, Decem- 
ber 19, and would be in charge of the third 



year class, 1900, who would tender a recep- 
tion to the foot-ball team of the College, 
and that the classes would bear all of the 
expenses of the evening. 

Harry L. Stiles reported for the Com- 
mittee on Memorial of the late Walter J. 
Sellers, '96, who was killed by the destruc- 
tion of the U. S. steamship " Maine," that a 
suitable tablet of brass could be procured 
with handsome backing for a reasonable 
sum, which was stated. 

On motion, the matter was referred back 
to the Committee, with power to raise the 
necessary funds. 

On motion, J. W. England, '83, was elected 
Editor and Wm. Nelson Stem, '73,was elected 
Business Manager of the Alumni Report, 
for the year 1900. 

The Secretary reported the following 
deaths of members and graduates : 

George W. Hackney, '91, died at New 
Salem, Pa., on Sunday, September 10, 1899. 

Benjamin Shoemaker, Jr., '66, died on 
Thursday, October 19, 1899, on Berkeley 
Avenue, Clifton Heights, of consumption, 
aged 54 years. He joined the Alumni Asso- 
ciation March 9, 1866. 

Washington Laycock, '58, died October 
12, 1899, at Kingston, N. Y. 

Wni. R. Lautenbacher, '96, died (drowned) 
near Pottsville, Pa., on Friday, August 25, 
1899, aged 25 years. He joined the Alumni 
Association April 13, 1896. 

Arthur B. James, '99, died in New York 
City (date not known). 

Dr. Dilwyn P. Pancoast, '56, died at the 
Cooper Hospital, Camden, N. J., on Saturday 
evening, November 4, 1899, aged 64 years. 

Dr. Harry N. Hall, '86, died February 20, 
1896, aged 32 years. He joined the Alumni 
Association March 16, 1886. 

Frederick F. Kappis, '88, died at Sisters- 
ville.W.Va., April 20, 1896. He joined the 
Alumni Association March 16, 1888. 

The Secretary reported the following ac- 
knowledgments from libraries who had 
received the Report : 

The University of Chicago Library, No. 
10, for October, 1899. 



26 



PAPERS. 



A L UMNI REPOR T, 
J'KBRUARY, /9w. 



*oya 



Bulletin de la Societe Royale de Pharmacie 
de Bruxelles, M. Duyk, Nos. lo and ii, for 
October and November, 1899. 

The Proceedings of the Pennsylvania 
Pharmaceutical Association of its Twenty- 
second Annual Meeting, held in Philadel- 
phia, June 13 and 14, 1899, from J. A. Miller, 
M.D., Secretary. 

The President appointed the following 
Committee to nominate the officers for the 
year 1 900-1 901 : 

F. Wm. E. Stedem, '82, President. 

Wm. E. Krewson, '69, Secretary. 

Wm. J. Jenks, '50. 



'67. 



Dr. Charles A. Weidemann, 
Dr. Adolph W. Miller, '62. 
Thos. S. Wiegand, '44. 
Jos. W. England, '83. 
Frank X. Moerk, '84. 
Wm. N. Stem, '73. 
Dr. Clement B. Lowe, '84. 
Harry L. Stiles, '86. 
James C. Perry, '91. 
Miss Florence Yaple, '95. 
Miss Clara Sprissler, '92. 
Jos. Crawford, '84. 



On motion, the meeting adjourned. 



(papers^ 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON NOMINATIONS FOR 
1900-01, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, P.C.P. 



At the meeting of the Executive Board 
ot the Alumni Association, held February 
2, 1900, the following report was presented : 

To the Preside7it and Members of the Execu- 
tive Board. 

Gentlemen : — The Committee appointed 
by the President to nominate officers for the 
Association for 1900-01 would report that 
the Committee convened in the library room 
of the College on Thursday, January 11, 
1900, according to the call issued by the 
Chairman. The following members of the 
Committee were present : 

F. Wm. E. Stedem, '83, President ; Wm. 
E. Krewson, '69, Secretary ; Thos. S. Wie- 
gand, '44; Dr. Chas. A. Weidemann, '67; 
Wm. N. Stem, '73 ; Dr. Clement B. Lowe, 
'84 ; Prof. Frank X. Moerk, '84 ; Miss Flor- 
ence Yaple, '95 ; James C. Perry, '91. 

Communications were received from Wm. 
J. Jenks, '50 ; Joseph Crawford, '84, and 
Miss Clara Sprissler, '92, regretting that 
they would be unable to be present. 

The President called the meeting to order 
at 4.30 P.M., and the Secretary called the 
roll of the Committee, after which the fol- 
lowing were nominated : 



President, Theodore Campbell, '93. 

First Vice-President, Cornelius E. Spence- 
ley, '78, and John H. Hahn, '81 (one to be 
chosen). 

Second Vice-President, Frank G. Ryan,' 84. 

Recording Secretary, Wm. E. Krewson, 
'69. 

Corresponding Secretary, Wm. G. Nebig, 
'86. 

Treasurer, Wm. Lincoln Clifle, '84. 

Members of the Board of Directors (five 
to be elected ; four for the term of three 
years and one for one year in place of Wm. 
G. Nebig, nominated for Corresponding 
Secretary) : 

Wm. N. Stem, ^-ji ; Jacob M. Baer, '81 ; 
Clarence H. Campbell, '90 ; Charles H. 
LaWall, '93 ; Albert Oetinger, '86 ; Sam'l 
E. R. Hassinger, '70; Dr. J. Louis D. Mori- 
son, '88 ; David H. Ross, '78 ; Melvin Wm. 
Bamford, '99 ; Miss Florence Yaple, '95 ; 
David Preston, '65 ; Jacob Eppstein, '92 ; L. 
S. A. Stedem, '93, and Henry A. Smith, '91. 

On motion, nominations were closed. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned j'^w^rfiV. 
Wm. E. Krewson, Secretary. 

Philadelphia, February /, igoo. 



A L UMNI REPOR T, 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



PAPERS. 



27 



THE PHILADELPHIA ASSOCIATION OF RETAIL 
DRUGGISTS' EUCHRE AND DANCE. 



The Progressive Euchre and Dance of the 
Philadelphia Association of Retail Druggists, 
scheduled for Wednesday evening, February 
7, 1900, at Horticultural Hall, Broad and 
Spruce Streets, this city, took place, and 
was a phenomenal success, 1,800 being 
present. 

It is worthy of note that this Euchre and 
Dance was the first of its kind to be given 
in the United States by an association of re- 
tail druggists. Philadelphia, it may be ad- 
ded, is not so slow as some of her critics try 
to make her appear. Xot only has she been 
the birthplace of American liberty, but she 
has been the birthplace of American 
pharmacy. Within her borders was founded 
the first College of Pharmacy of the new 
world — which to-day leads in teaching, as it 
always has led. Within the Quaker City was 
issued the first journal of pharmacy in this 
country', the American Joiirnal of Pharmacy; 
was organized the American Pharmaceutical 
Association; was prepared the subject-mat- 
ter of many of the earlier revisions of the 
U. S. Pharmacopoeia ; were written both the 
U. S. Dispensatory and the National Dispen- 
satory, and also were developed such emi- 
nent pharmaceutical workers as Procter, 
Parrish, Maisch, Remington, Sadtler and 
Trimble. 

Philadelphia, to-day, leads the country in 
other lines. Her shipyards, her locomotive 
works, her carpet manufactories and her 
various mechanical industries are famed 
far and wide, and her association of re- 
tail druggists is to-day the largest in num- 
bers and the strongest and most progres- 
sive of its kind in the land. 

Never before in the history of Philadel- 
phia drugdom has there been such an out- 
pouring of the craft as at this Euchre and 
Dance — and in full-dress suits, too — with 
their fair friends and fair relatives, a gath- 
ering of such charming women, in such ar- 
tistic gowns that its beauty excited universal 
pleasure and comment, and never before. 



probably, has the craft manifested such a 
lively enthusiasm and whole-souled enjoy- 
ment. 

The patronesses of the occasion were : 

Mrs. A. F. Ashmead, Mrs. H. C. Blair, Mrs. J. D. 
Burg, Mrs. H. J. Batdorff, Mrs. E. M. Boring, Mrs. T. 
J. Buckman, Mrs. J. M. Baer, Mrs. H. A. Borell, 
Mrs. G. McL. Bowman, Mrs. B. L. Brown, Mrs. 
C. H. Bohn, Mrs. C. F. Chandler, Mrs. R. C. 
Cadmus. Mrs. W. L. Cliffe, Mrs. Theo. Campbell, 
Mrs. W. H. Campbell, Mrs. G. P. Conner, Mrs. C. 
H. Campbell, Mrs. W. W. Chalfant, Mrs. J. L. 
Crothers, Mrs. B. Frank Davis, Mrs. Eberly, Mrs. C. 
A. Eckels, Mrs. J. Eppstein, Mrs. W. A. Fetters, 
Mrs. L. C. Funk, Mrs. E. A. Fahy, Mrs. G. W. Fehr, 
Mrs. E. J. Finnerty, Jr., Mrs. W. Fitch, Mrs. Farrow, 
Mrs. A. J. Frankeberger, Mrs. W. H. Gano, Mrs. E. 
R. Gatchell, Mrs. Louis Genois, Mrs. F. GrofF, 
Mrs. C. H. Gubbins, Mrs. D. M. Harris, Mrs. J. G. 
Howard, Miss S. G. Haydock, Mrs. C. E. Howard, 
Mrs. A. Hoch, Mrs. S. E. R. Hassenger, Mrs. Wm. 
Harris, Mrs. J. \V. Harrigan, Mrs. W. B. Jones, Mrs. 
F. W. Jordan, Mrs. C. E. Keeler, Mrs. Mahlon Kratz, 
Mrs. W. H. Lantz, Mrs. Chas. Leedom, Mrs. J. G. 
Long, Mrs. \V. H. Lacey, Mrs. Wm. Mclntyre, Mrs. 
F. E. Morgan, Mrs. C. C. Meyer, Mrs. E. G. F. 
Mickley, Mrs. Louis Murjahn, Mrs. J. P. Mallon, 
Mrs. Wm. Morrison, Mrs. J. B. Moore, Mrs. J. D. 
McFerren, Mrs. M. O. Milligan, Mrs. Robt. McNeil, 
Mrs. T. ^L Newbold, Mrs. H. A. Nolle, Mrs. H. E. 
Nicoud, Mrs. J. J. Ottinger, Mrs. A. Oetinger, Mrs. J. 
C. Perry. Mrs.W. H. Foley, Mrs. E. M. Piatt, Mrs. W. 
Procter, Mrs. T. H. Potts, Mrs. W. J. Pechin. Mrs. 
David Preston, Mrs. A. T. Pollard, Mrs. J. A. Rudy, 
Mrs. W. A. Rumsey, Mrs. H. H. Ross, Mrs. D. W. 
Ross, Mrs. U. G. Ruff, Mrs. Chas. Rehfuss, Mrs. N. P. 
Reidenauer, Mrs. J. F. Sands, Mrs. C. Scattergood, 
Mrs. E. T. Spencer, Mrs. H. L. Stiles, Mrs. F. W. E. 
Stedem, Mrs. F. P. Streeper, Mrs. A. J. Seeler, 
Mrs. J. \L Stoever, Mrs. H. Swain, Mrs. W. F. 
Steinmetz, Mrs. J. D. Seiberling, Mrs. H. J. Seigfried, 
Mrs. J. S. Schmehl, Mrs. E. C. Stout, Mrs. E. W. 
Supplee, Mrs. W. A. Shannon, Mrs. W. G. Toplis, Mrs. 
W. H. Vandergrift, Mrs. G. Y. Wood, Mrs. G. B. 
Winebrener, Mrs. N. F. Weisner, Mrs. J. Wolgemuth, 
Mrs. C. A. Weidemann, Mrs. Geo. W. Shingle, Mrs. 
C. W. Warrington. 

Shortly after the opening hour, McDer- 
mott's famous orchestra played "Hail to 
the Chief," when his Honor, the Mayor of 
the city of Philadelphia, Samuel H. Ash- 
bridge, entered the hall and' passed through 
the dense crowds to the stage, escorted, by 



28 



PAPERS. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



Clarence H. Campbell, where he was re- 
ceived by the Chairman of the Entertain- 
ment Committee, Daniel M. Harris, who, 
in a few appropriate remarks, welcomed 
Mayor Ashbridge — the latter, it is interest- 
ing to state, began his career as a druggist 
with Robert Shoemaker & Co., of this city — 
and introduced him to the guests of the 
evening. 

Mayor Ashbridge expressed his pleasure 



the largest of its kind ever held in Horti- 
cultural Hall, 1,200 players being engaged 
in 30 sections of 40 people each, 4 players 
to each table. Each section was presided 
over by the following members of the En- 
tertainment Committee : 

D. M. Harris, C. H. Campbell, T. M. Newbold. 
Mahlon Kratz, E. J. Finnerty, Jr., H. L. Stiles, J. 
M. Baer, H. C. Blair, Jr., J. G. Howard, Chas. Lee- 
dom, E. T. Spencer, V^ . L. Cliffe. 




HON. SAMUEL H. ASHBRIDGE, 

Mayor of Philadelphia. 



at being present, and made some very happy 
introductory remarks upon the relations of 
retail druggists to the general public. He 
then extended most hearty greetings, and 
wished all a very pleasant evening. 

Following the address, which was listened 
to with close attention and enthusiastically 
applauded. Chairman Harris announced the 
rules of the game of euchre to be played, 
the bell rang (not fire), but go ahead. The 
game then began. The function was one of 



The committee was assisted by : 

Wm. Mclntyre, L. C. Funk, W. H. Laubach, Russell 
Blackwood, W. J. Pechin, Charles Reshfuss, W. H. 
Gano, W. T. Steinmetz, Frank Groff, George Lam- 
bert, Warren Foley, Jesse Pechin, J. C. Perry, W. W. 
Chalfant, C. F. Chandler, S. C. Henry, David Pres- 
ton, J. A. Rudy, E. R. Gatchell, J. L. Crothers, G. 
W. Fehr, Nelson Fry. 

Each table was furnished with cards, and 
tally cards for ten games, which latter were 
held of six minutes' duration, with two 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



PAPERS. 



29 



minutes interval between each. Catchy mu- 
sical airs were rendered by the orchestra 
during the intervals. The original number 
of prizes announced was 150, not enough 
to give one to each player, but the 150 
grew to ZTyd, which made about one prize 
to every fifth player. 

The prizes offered were both generous in 
number and valuable, their value being esti- 
mated to be upwards of $1,000. The com- 
plete list of the firms and individuals who 
donated money or prizes is as follows: 

Pharmaceutical Era, Smith, Kline & French Com- 
pany, Eavenson Soap Company, L. C. Funk, Lang- 
dorf Company, Frank Teller, B. F. Lockwood, Jensen 
Press, Johnson & Johnson, J. Elwood Lee Company, 
Frank Groff, Colgate & Company, H. K. Mulford 
Company, Robert Shoemaker & Co., Seabury & John- 
son, C. F. Chandler, Royal Malt Company, George 
Geyer Company, Shoemaker & Busch, Parke, Davis & 
Co., Whitall, Tatum & Co., Armour & Co., Merck & 
Co., William R. Warner & Co., Frank E. Engleman, 
Harris & Bemtz, Mrs. Hunter, Boltz, Clymer & Co., 
John Wyeth & Bro., Schieffelin & Co., Roig & Co., 
American Druggist, Lazell, Dalley & Co., Eisenlohr cV' 
Bros.. Sharpe & Dohme, Geo. D. Feidt, Undergrift cV 
Co., E.T. Spencer, W. T. Steinmetz, Robert Klee,Wm. 
B. Burk & Co., Chas. Leedom, Leidel Coffin, Drued- 
ing & Co., H. C. Blair, Jr., Emerson Drug Company, 
La Hilda Cigar Company, Sovereign Remedy Com- 
pany, Charles Burk, Aschenbach & Miller, Charles 
Lippincott, Valentine H. Smith & Co., J. G. Howard, 
Shinn & Baer, A. E. Norris & Co., American Journal 
of Pharmacy , Q2:n7. & Co., Winkelman & Brown Drug 
Company, A. E. Dowie & Co., H. L. Stiles, Chas. Hil- 
born, J. C. Perry, W. A. Rumsey, W. W. Woodnutt, 
Saltsburg Bottle Works Company, J. Eppstein, Bauer 
& Black, Wallace Procter, J. J. Georges & Sons, H. 
K. Wampole & Co., Campbell & Bro., Reinle Brothers 
& Salmon, Hance Bros. & White, Vin Mariani Com- 
pany, S. H. Wetmore & Co.. E. Kessling & Co., D. 
M. Harris, W. H. Laubach, C. H. Campbell, Crown 
Perfumery Company, Andrew Blair & Co., Henry Tet- 
low & Co., F. S. Cleaver & Co., George Lambert, 
New York Consolidated Playing Card Company — wIkj 
generously contributed their finest cards, as souvenirs 
for the occasion — John M. Maris & Co., Henry C. Fox 
& Sons, Rosengarten & Sons, Powers & Weightman, 
Chas. Lippincott & Co., Fairchild Bros. & Foster, Dr. 
D. Jayne & Son, Shoemaker & Busch, Mellor & Ritten- 
house Co., Wm. Mclntyre, Paul Rieger & Co., Santi- 
ago J. Coll & Co.. W. P. Bushell & Co., J. Wolge- 
muth, W. H. Pile & Son, E. J. Finnerty, Jr., R. M. 
Green & Co., F. W. E. Stedem, Johnson, Holloway & 
Co., Rittenhouse Cigar Company, Schandein «& Lind, 
Fred. Stearnes & Co., Harry Swain, H. Gamse & Bro., 



Charles HiUborn, Henry Jonas, Mrs. C. E. Howard 
and Charles E. Hires, who, with great liberality, slaked, 
with his tasty Root Beer, the " thirsty thirsts " of 1,800 
red-hot throats. 

At 10.15 PM. a sonorous and sweet-toned 
cow-bell was rung to notify the belles and their 
escorts that the game was up, and everybody 
adjourned to the hall downstairs to see the 
fun of prize-getting ; and there was in this 
scene, ofttimes, as much fun to the beholders 
as to the receivers of prizes. In the distri- 
bution of the prizes the following method 
was adopted : The prizes were equally di- 
vided between the men and women. The 
players winning the highest number of games 
drew for the first prize, after which drawings 
were made for subsequent prizes according 
to the number of games won, the valuation 
of the prizes diminishing with each drawing. 

It is of interest to add that the first woman's 
prize, of a beautiful mahogany French dress- 
ing table, with bevelled plate glass, was won 
by Mrs. R. P. Ross, and that the first man's 
prize of a inagnificent cut-glass punch bowl 
was won by Robert Duncan Coombs. 

The dancing programme included a "P. 
A. R. D. March," composed for the occasion 
and led by the leading cornetist of the First 
Regiment Band ; Waltzes, Two-Steps, Lan- 
ders, Quadrille, Schottische, etc. 

At nearly the end of the dancing, E. J. 
Finnerty, Jr., rendered, by request, the 
song, " Oh! Promise Me," which was so en- 
thusiastically received that he was com- 
pelled to respond to a number of encores. 
Then, the tired and happy guests wended 
their ways homeward, with grateful thoughts, 
doubtless, for the royal good time, socially, 
the Philadelphia Association of Retail Drug- 
gists had given them, and hoping that the 
Association, having achieved such pre-emi- 
nent success in this, their first social venture, 
might be tempted, in the future, to renew the 
prescription at the same, or at an advanced 
price, if needs be. 

So closeth the first Progressive Euchre 
and Dance given by an association of retail 
druggists in this country. Let us hope that 
the example will become contagious. 



30 



PAPERS. 



ALUMNI REPORT 

FEBRUARY, 1900. 



A VISIT TO THE BACTERIOLOGIC LABORATORIES OF 
THE H. K. MULFORD COMPANY. 

By a. Fabian and W. H. Guest, Reporters for the Class in Bacteriology. 



Through the courtesy of the H. K. Mul- 
ford Company, a visit was made to their 
bacteriologic laboratories by the special 
class in bacteriology of the Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, under Prof. Henry Krae- 
mer. 

The class had already visited the vaccine 
farms and laboratories of the firm at Glen- 
olden Farms, Delaware County, and the 



equipped for original research and for the 
production of the various biological products. 

The stables have a capacity for 150 horses. 

At the time of our visit ninety-seven horses 
were under observation and over 100 rabbits 
and 1,200 guinea-pigs. Besides, the firm 
have a special building in which over 3,000 
guinea-pigs are kept for breeding their ani- 
mals for their own laboratories. 




BIOI.OaiCAL I.ABuhW loRV A.\/> SJABLh.'i. 



object in visiting the bacteriologic labora- 
tories was to study the methods carried out 
by this firm in the preparation of the various 
biologic products in process of develop- 
ment. 

The laboratories are located at Thirty- 
ninth and Cambridge Streets (opposite Fair- 
mount Park). The laboratories contain 
much special apparatus and are thoroughly 



The products of the laboratories are: Diph- 
theria antitoxin, tetanus antitoxin (for tetanus 
or lockjaw), anti-streptococcic serum (for 
blood poisoning, puerperal fever and strep- 
tococcic infections), anti-pneumococcic se- 
rum (for the treatment of pneumonia), influ- 
enza antitoxin (for distemper and influenza 
in horses), tuberculin, mallein, anthrax and 
black-leg vaccines and anti-venine antidote 



A L UMNI REP OR T, 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



PAPERS. 



31 



for the bite of poisonous reptiles. The firm, 
however, finds a much larger sale for diph- 
theria antitoxin, and it is this preparation 
that the class found most interesting to ex- 
amine. 

The method of producing antitoxin for 
diphtheria was demonstrated by Professors 



1 1 Iff SIM 




INTERIOR OF STABLE. 

McFarland and Lincoln, and the process is 
as follows : 

As virulent a culture of the bacillus of 
diphtheria is obtained as possible. It is 
grown upon Loeffler's solidified blood-serum 
mixture, and placed in an incubator at a 
temperature of 45° C. After a period of 
twenty-four hours the cultures are developed. 




GROUP OF HORSES YIELDING CONCENTRATED 
ANTITOXIN. 

From this a single colony of the bacilli is 
transferred into flasks of peptone bouillon. 
These flasks are placed in the incubator and 
kept at a constant temperature of 37° C, 
until the bacilli have become very numerous, 
and have elaborated an enormous amount of 
active and powerful toxin in the bouillon. 



To the bouillon, or, as it is now termed, 
"diphtheria toxin," i per cent, of trikresol 
is added, which kills the bacilli in the bouil- 
lon, then filtered through a modified Cham- 
berland filter to separate it from the dead 
bodies of the diphtheria bacilli. No bacilli 
are, therefore, injected into the animals to be 
immunized, and they are not given "diph- 
theria,'" but the toxin developed by the ba- 
cilli. The toxicity of the toxin is determined 
by its injection into guinea-pigs, and, to be 
of a desired strength, o'oi to o'l cubic cen- 
timetre should produce death of the control- 
animal in from twenty-four to thirty-six hours. 
For the preparation of diphtheria anti- 
toxin, horses are preferred, inasmuch as 
they are more easily operated upon, and 
because they furnish excellent serum in 
liberal quantities. 




TYPE OF -'• : 

Before injecting with toxin the mallein-test 
for glanders and the tuberculin-test for tuber- 
culosis are made, the results of such being 
clearly shown by the temperature, which is 
carefully recorded. Animals responding to 
either of these tests are discarded. It is 
thus assured that healthy animals are used 
exclusively. 

The primary injection of the toxin is i 
cubic centimetre, and in equal periods ot 
from six to eight days constantly increasing 
amounts of the toxin are administered, until 
in about ten weeks to three months as great 
quantities as 300 cubic centimetres of this 
powerful toxin may be borne with tolerance. 
When the injection of these large amounts 
is accompanied with but little elevation of 
temperature, trial-bleedings are taken from 



32 



PAPERS. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



the jugular vein. Before the bleeding of the 
horses, the operating-room is thoroughly 
cleansed with antiseptic solutions and for- 
maldehyde gas. If the tests for antitoxin 
value are favorable, the horse is bled a large 
quantity, the blood being collected in sterile 
bottles, and placed in a refrigerating-room 




SECT/ON OF 



LABORATORY GROWING 
TOXINS. 



or sufficient time (about twenty-four hours) 
until coagulation allows the clear serum, 
which contains the antitoxin, to separate. 
This serum is drawn off by pipettes, and 
preserved by the addition of 05 per cent, 
of trikresol. 
The most important step now awaits the 




SECTION OF ANIMAL ROOM. 

operator — the determination of the exact 
strength possessed by the antitoxin, as ex- 
pressed in immunizing units.* For this 

* Briefly, an immunizing unit is the amount of 
antitoxin serum required to save a 300-gramnie 
guinea-pig from 100 times tiie minimum fatal dose 
of diphtheria toxin. 



purpose, the minimum fatal dose of a strong 
toxin is accurately determined by the injec- 
tion of various amounts into a number of 
guinea-pigs, the smallest amount of toxin 
that invariably causes death of the animal 
in a reasonable time being regarded as the 
minimum fatal dose. It is usually calculated 
so much per 100 grammes body-weight. 

A transcript from the laboratory record 
shows this determination of strength. Hav- 
ing found the minimum fatal dose of the 
toxin used to be 0005 per 100 grammes 
guinea-pig, the animals are given 100 times 
this absolutely fatal dose of diphtheria toxin 
per 100 grammes weight. If testing for 250 
units per cubic centimetre, ii^^^Ty cubic cen- 
timetre of antitoxin would be given ; if for 
500 units, -5-^^15-5 cubic centimetre of anti- 
toxin would be administered. 




GROUP OF GUINEA-PIGS. 

The absolute scientific value and correct- 
ness of these tests may be appreciated by 
the fact that the unit strength of antitoxin is 
as accurately determined as though it were 
possible to reckon the amount of sleep that 
a fixed weight of morphine would produce 
in a patient of a given number of pounds 
weight. 

The strength of the antitoxin is deter- 
mined by its neutralizing or protective value 
upon the animals receiving 100 times the 
absolutely fatal amount of toxin. It is im- 
possible to determine the exact dose for 
therapeutic application, since the human 
subject is much more susceptible to the 
poison than the guinea-pig, and there is no 
possible means of determining the amount 
of toxin produced by the diphtheria bacilli 
in the patient suffering with diphtheria ; 
therefore, if any error is made in amount 
of antitoxin administered, it should be its 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



PAPERS. 



33 



administration in excessive rather than an 
insufficient quantity. 

Diphtheria antitoxin is a most delicate sub- 
stance, and its preparation can only be safely 
carried on in thoroughly equipped institu- 
tions, where men of undoubted integrity and 
ability are in supervision. While antitoxin 




INJECTI.XG TOXIS. 

is a delicate substance, yet, when a proper 
preservative (trikresol, '5 percent.) in a suffi- 
cient amount is used, and it is hermetically 
sealed in sterile vials or special bulbs, it pre- 
serves its strength and antitoxic value for at 
least six months ; indeed, repeated experi- 
ments prove that it retains its activity for a 
much longer period. The only disadvantage 
of trikresol is that it gives a fluorescent ap- 
pearance to the serum, but the absence of 
cloudiness is shown by permitting the light 
to enter squarely through the tubes contain- 
ing the finished product. 

To protect druggists in handling and 
physicians in employing antitoxin, the 
method of dating antitoxin was devised, at 
the expiration of which it is to be returned 
in exchange for a fresh supply ; this ex- 
change entails no expense on the druggist 
or physician except the cost of mailing. 

Antitoxin is usually supplied in tubes con- 
taining varj'ing quantities of serum, but of a 
certain number of immunizing units. This 
is apt to lead to confusion, and therefore 
an antitoxin is supplied of a fixed stand- 
ard of a definite number of immunizing 
units in each cubic centimetre of serum. 
While this involves extra labor, it prevents 
confusion on the part of the physician, and 
the end is well worthy of the increased 
labor. 



This firm now produces serums of which 
each cubic centimetre contains as much as 
1,000 units. This overcomes the chief ob- 
jection that has been urged against the 
serum — more prompt absorption takes 
place, insuring quicker results, besides the 
attendant dread caused by the large instru- 
ments necessary for the introduction of larger 
amounts of weaker serums. The accepted 
theorj^ of the action of antitoxin is that it 
renders the living cells of the organism 
tolerant to the toxin liberated by the diph- 
theria bacilli, and by increasing this toler- 
ance they are able to overcome these toxins 
and neutralize their deleterious action. 

For the preparation of anti-venine, the 
firm have a large collection of rattlesnakes, 
copper-heads, moccasins and cobras. The 
method of obtaining the venom from the 
snake was demonstrated by Dr. Ranck, who 
has direction of the stables and animals. A 
large rattlesnake was secured by means of a 
leather loop attached to a pole, the mouth 
of the snake was opened by the thumb and 
forefinger, a special shape test-tube with 
narrow mouth was then pressed back of the 
fangs, and about a teaspoonful of venom 




BLEEDING HORSE. 

was collected. This operation is termed 
"milking the snake." The venom is dried 
over sulphuric acid, forming into scales or 
crystals of a "pepsin-like" appearance. 
The venom is injected in minute quantities 
and amount gradually increased until the 
horses are bled and the serum collected in 
the manner described in the preparation of 
diphtheria antitoxin. 



34 



OUR GRADUATES. 



A L UMNI RE FOR T, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



With the energy commendable to the Mul- 
ford Company, the preparation of Haffkine's 
plague vaccine and anti-plague serum for 
the worst scourge of man, the bubonic 
plague, is now being carried on, and this 
preparation will soon be ready for shipment 
to afflicted countries. These products, how- 
ever, are prepared in a separate laboratory 



and buildings entirely remote and distant 
from the other laboratories or buildings. 

The Mulford Company is composed of 
graduates of the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy, to whom was tendered a hearty 
vote of thanks, as well as to those in 
direction of the biological work, Drs. Mc- 
Farland, Ranck, Lincoln and their assistants. 



®ur (5rabuates. 



(In order to make this department of the Report as 
generally interesting as possible, the graduates of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy are requested to send 
items of information concerning graduatesto the editor 
of the Report. By so doing, they can keep in social 
touch with fellow-graduates and renew the friendships 
of college days.) 

MEMORIAL ROSTER. 

Douglas — On May 24, 1895, at Baltimore, 
Md., John Wyeth Douglas, '40. He resided 
at Chambersburg, Pa. , and practised law. 

Kappes — On April 20, 1896, at Sisters- 
ville, W. Va. , of pneumonia, Frederick 
Franklin Kappes, '88, aged 31 years. 

Pancoast — On Saturday, November 4, 
1899, at Cooper Hospital, Camden, N. J., 
Dr. Dilwyn Parrish Pancoast, '56, aged 62 
years. 

White — On Thursday, November 30, 1899, 
at Ocean Grove, N. J., Andrew Allison 
White, '76. 

Franklin — On Tuesday, January 9, 1900, 
at 2311 Atlantic Avenue, Atlantic City, N. J., 
Dr. Thomas Hare Franklin, '60, of heart 
failure, aged 59 years. 

MARRIAGE ROSTER. 

Lukens — Klinger. On June 28, 1899, C. 
Boker Lukens, '97, to Pauline Terrissa 
Klinger, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August 
C. Klinger, of Philadelphia. 

Stewart — Smith. On January 10, 1900, 
S. S. Stewart, '94, of East Palestine, O., to 
Miss Mary Alice Smith, daughter of H. H. 
Smith, of Columbiana, O. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stewart will reside in East Palestine. 



STORE CHANGES. 

Theophilus N. Corbyn, '76, has 

opened a new drug store, corner Tinicum 
Avenue and Island Road, Philadelphia, 
called " Boon's Dam Pharmacy." 

David G. Potts, ''j2„ has removed his 

store from 24 South Second Street, to 224 
Market Street, Philadelphia. 

Frank P. Semmel, Jr., '96, formerly 

of AUentown, Pa., has purchased the drug 
store of C. T. Horn. M.D., at Lehighton, 

Pa. 

ADDRESSES WANTED. 

Secretary Wm. E. Krewson desires 

the addresses of the following graduates: 

Geo. W. Hackenberger, '90. 
Robert Gibson, '80. 
Franklin P. Shaak, '87. 
Calvin Jordan, '94. 
Gomer David Owen, '84. 
Morris Leedom, '95. 
John R. Light, '96. 
Albert S. Nichols, '93. 
Elias Mader, '95. 
Samuel F. StoU, '85. 
Gustave Adolphus Otgen, '81. 
J. Fred'k Windolph, '85. 
H. G. La Master, '95. 
Frank W. Brown, '81. 
Wm. C. Zinnel, '89. 
Ferdinand Holberg, '86. 
H. E. Steinhilber, '82. 
John H. Habley, '94. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



OUR GRADUATES. 



35 



Thos. Mooradian, '94. 
Thomas Jackson, '96. 
Chas. E. Slough, '80. 
Bertram McClure, '88. 
Howard F. Stine, '96. 
David A. Buehler, '96. 

CHANGED ADDRESSES. 

The following have changed ad- 
dresses. Their addresses now are : 

David Dalton, '91, Sharon Hill, Pa. 

Frank P. Semmel, Jr., '96, Lehighton, 

Pa. 

Robert Grafton Shoults, '99, Sonoma, 

Cal. 

J. Frederick Windolph, '85, Norwich, 

N. Y. 

Walter Clement Mutty, '99, Berlin, 

N. H. 

Charles Kohler, '93, 1541 Chestnut 

Street. 

Josiah Hodkinson-Furman, '93, 1541 

Chestnut Street. 

Albert A. Chance, '93, Cambridge, 

Dorcester Co., Md. 

Chas. H. Smith, '95, 97 Water Street, 

Binghampton, N. Y. 

David G. Potts, '73, 224 Market 

Street, Philadelphia. 

B. Morris Magill, 'T2,, 121S Broadway, 

New York City, N. Y. 

Samuel M. Strohecker, '90, 319 Frank- 
lin Street, Reading, Pa. 

Frank W. Droelle, '87, 271 Gratiot 

Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Wm. L. Peabody, '95, 3912 Lindell 

Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

John Allen McFall, '99, 7 Palmetto 

Street, Charleston, S. C. 

George F. Wild, '96, 191 Lafayette 

Street, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Newton C. Baker, '97, 225 South 

Tenth Street, Philadelphia. 



Wm. Bell Walter, '98, co James S. 

Robinson, Memphis, Tenn. 

Wm. P. Grady, '99, c/o Dr. Meeker, 

Medico-Chirurgical College. 

Wm. Henry Myers, "95, 127 North 

Warren Street, Trenton, N. J. 

Willard C. Andrews, '99, 17 South 

Twelfth Street, Richmond, Va. 

Elwood K. Pflieger, '99, 408 West 

Huntingdon Street, Philadelphia. 

Edward D. Helfrich, '96, Columbus, 

O., care Ohio Medical L^niversity. 

Harry Reed Hess, '92, 1302 North 

Allison Street, West Philadelphia. 

Chartton G. Johnson, '96, c/o Wm. 

Wilson, 86 Broadway, New York. 

Harvey H. Mentzer, '93, 5521 Morris 

Street, Germantown, Philadelphia. 

Archibald Alex. Gracey, '90, 2302 

North Twelfth Street, Philadelphia. 

G. Emil Chalquest, '99, c/o McArthur 

& Winston Bros., Memphis, Tenn. 

Robert August Koempel, '76, 218 

East Eighty-sixth Street, New York. 

Dr. Samuel Edward Power, '82, 616 

North Sixteenth Street, Philadelphia. 

Theophilus N. Corbyn, '76, Tinicum 

Avenue and Island Road, Philadelphia. 

W. E. Ridenour. '95, 258 Zeralda 

Street, Germantown. 

Chas. H. Riegel, '93, southwest corner 

Fifty-eighth and Vine Streets, Philadelphia. 

James D. King, '98, northeast corner 

Eighth Street and Girard Avenue, Phila- 
delphia. 

Dr. Charles Schabinger, '96, S. W. 

cor. Eleventh and Brown Streets, Philadel- 
phia. 

PERSONALS. 

John P. Frey, '83, drives a quartette 

of drug stores, so to speak, owning four. 



36 



OUR GRADUATES. 



ALUMJVI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



Pinckney N. Pinchback, '87, is seri- 
ously ill. 

Charles C. Trauck, '90, has chanj^ed 

his address to 2924 High Street, Camden, 

N.J. 

The many friends of Harry V. Arny, 

'89, will be pleased to learn of his entire 
recovery from ill health. 

Edwin Chas. Tragesser, '92, 2226 

Fontain Street, this city, is now acting as 
relief clerk ('Phone No. 2-32-15). 

Paul H. Gross, '97, has accepted a 

position as manager with Taney & Co., 
Johnstown, Pa. 

Wm. T. Hankey, '91, junior member 

of the firm of Benton, Myers & Co., Cleve- 
land, O., was a Philadelphia visitor re- 
cently. 

Dr. C. H. Gubbins, '8r, is demon- 
strator of pharmacy in the medical depart- 
ment of the Medico-Chirurgical College, of 
this city. 

Robert C. Brodie, '44, of Philadelphia, 

is Treasurer of St. Alban's Lodge of Masons, 
and has been elected for twenty-six consecu- 
tive terms. 

Edward K. Cope, '97, has purchased 

the store of the late Dr. J. M. Higgins, at 
Norris Street and Germantown Avenue, 
Philadelphia. 

W. E. Ridenour, '95, is now residing 

at 258 Zeralda Street, Germantown, Pa. 
Mr. Ridenour was recently elected Secre- 
tary of the Chemical Section of the Franklin 
Institute. 

Clarence Blaine Gowen, special stu- 
dent of chemistry, '96, of St. Qunous Mills, 
Ga., but now located at West Gate, la., was 
recendy married to Miss Edna Augusta 
Latimer, of West Gate, la. 

Under the direction of Wm. E. Krew- 

son, '69, Secretary of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, the reading room of the College, 
which is in his charge, and is open daily 



from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M., has proved to be a 
valuable feature of the institution, not only 
to the stucletits, but also to empUjyers wish- 
ing employees through the medium of the 
Bureau of Employment, of which latter our 
genial Secretary is the active agent. 

NOTES. 

The bodies of 151 of the ill-fated men 

of the U. S. S. "Maine," destroyed in 
Havana harbor, have been transported by 
the Government, and some have been 
buried in the Arlington Cemetery, at Wash- 
ington, and some elsewhere. Among the 
bodies was that of the late Walter S. Sellers, 
'98, apothecary of the "Maine," to whom 
it is proposed to erect, in the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy, a memorial tablet. 

Walter V. Smith, '89, has been elected 

President of the Philadelphia Drug Exchange. 
At the banquet celebrating the thirty-fifth 
anniversary of the Exchange, held January 
25, 1900, in the Phiiadelphia Bourse, Clayton 
F. Shoemaker, '70, who has been President 
of the Exchange for two terms, acted as 
toastmaster. In opening the speech-mak- 
ing, he announced that the newly-elected 
President, Walter V. Smith, was suffering 
from severe illness, and expressed the sym- 
pathy they felt for him and their prayer for 
his speedy recovery. Upon his suggestion, 
it was resolved to send the flowers from the 
tables to Mr. Smith, as a token of their regard. 
Mr. Smith had prepared a brief address, 
which the toastmaster read. In it Mr. Smith 
called to mind the jealousies and exclusive- 
ness that ruled in the drug trade before the 
Exchange was formed, there being so little 
intercourse between houses in the same 
business that members of prominent houses 
did not know the men of equally prominent 
establishments in the same business. All 
this has happily been changed by the Drug 
Exchange, which has been a means of mu- 
tual help to all. Mr. Smith also referred to 
the active part taken by the organization in 
promoting and sustaining the National Ex- 
port Exposition. 



A L UMNI REPOR 7 , 
FEBRUARY, igoo. 



OUR GRADUATES. 



37 



Prof. Joseph P. Remington, Dean of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, also 
spoke, and said that all those connected 
with the drug trade were realizing the value 
of the era of good feeling introduced by the 
Drug Exchange. This feeling extends all 
through the trade, and whereas there was a 
time when the retail druggist felt that the 
wholesaler and the jobber had him by the 
throat, that feeling had passed away. Some- 
times he thought the wholesalers were in- 
clined to think that the retailer had them by 
the throat, but there was no reason why the 
representatives of all branches of the trade 
should not regard each other as friends, and 
he thought that was the rule nowadays. 

The Medicine Chest of the " Maine " 

has been specially designed by Henry S. 
Wellcome, a graduate of the P.C.P., Class of 
'77, and the whole of the work has been 
done by the firm of Burroughs, Wellcome & 
Co., of London. The matter is thus referred 
to by the Pharmaceutical Jojirnal (1899, 
610): 

On the top panel appear the Union Jack 
and Stars and Stripes entwined ; portraits of 
George Washington, Queen Victoria and 
President McKinley, and representations of 
the American Eagle and British Lion. The 
front panel bears portraits of Lady Randolph 
Churchill (President), Mrs. Ronalds (Hon. 
Treasurer), and Mrs. Blow (Hon. Secretary 
of the American Ladies' Hospital Ship Com- 
mittee); a picture of the " Maine ; " a scene 
representing the British Lion wounded by an 
arrow, being administered to by Britannia 
and Columbia. A frieze is formed by a rep- 
resentation of American Indian wampum, 
upon which are depicted Brother Jonathan 
and John Bull grasping hands. The panel 
at each end of the chest represents Britannia 
and Columbia supporting a banner bearing 
the Red Cross ; also representations of the 
national emblems — the English oak and 
American corn. The panel at the back of 
the chest depicts a charge of British Regular 
and Colonial Lancers, and a Highland Bri- 
gade. The Boers hold their ground shel- 



tered behind rocks and boulders. The 
bugler-boy who felled three Boers is notice- 
able in the scene. Prominently inscribed on 
the chest is Keble's line, "No distance 
breaks the tie of blood," and Ambassador 
Bayard's notable phrase, "Our kin across 
the sea." The chest is made of oak and 
covered with Carthaginian cowhide, upon 
which the designs are tooled by hand. With 
one exception the whole of the medical staff 
of the ship and five non-commissioned offi- 
cers are Americans, acting under the direc- 
tion of Surgeon-Major Cabell, of the United 
States Army. The exception is Surgeon- 
Lieut. -Colonel Hensman, of the British Army 
Medical Service, who is in command, as 
representing the War Office. Three Ameri- 
can doctors have volunteered their services 
—Dr. George Eugene Dodge and Dr. Harry 
H. Hodman, of New York ; and Dr. Charles 
H. Weber, of Philadelphia. Miss M. E. 
Hibbard is chief of the five nurses. Lady 
Randolph Churchill will also accompany the 
"Maine," a special cabin elegantly and 
comfortably furnished on the main deck 
being placed at her service. The ship flies 
three flags — the Union Jack (presented by 
Her Majesty the Queen), the Stars and 
Stripes, and the Red Cross in addition to the 
Admiralty transport flag. She is the first 
vessel which any nation has ever dispatched 
to succour the wounded forces of another 
state. 

An unusual combination of commercial 

sagacity and technical skill, states the Aineri- 
can Druggist, was brought together when 
Henry G. Keasbey and Richard V. Mattison, 
both of whom graduated in the Class of 
1873 of the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy, entered into partnership and opened 
a laboratory on North Juniper Street, above 
Arch, shortly after their graduation. Dr. 
Mattison undertook the introduction of their 
granulated effervescent salts to the medical 
profession, and travelled all over the United 
States interviewing physicians and drug- 
gists. At the end of nine months a need for 
larger quarters compelled the enterprising 



38 



CLASS NEWS. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
lEBRUARY, i^>.. 



young firm to move to Filbert Street, while 
two years later another move was rendered 
requisite, when the firm settled at 332 North 
Front Street, and later added the two houses 
lying next to this number. The firm decided 
to engage in the manufacture of quinine, and 
shortly after doing so, found it necessary to 
move their quinine factor}' to Ambler, a town 
some sixteen miles north of Pennsylvania, 
where they had already established a mag- 
nesia works. They were successful in this 
as in other ventures, and in 1887 had the 
sagacity to foresee the decline of quinine, 
and their circular on 25-cent quinine, issued 
in that year, created almost a panic in the 
trade. The growth of their business in the 
manufacture of magnesia coverings for steam 
pipes, etc., was so rapid as to lead them to 
abandon the manufacture of quinine, and 
devote their energies to magnesia. 

The business done in magnesia sectional 
coverings by this firm is enormous. A large 
number of the locomotives running on such 
representative roads as the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, Lehigh Valley, Grand Trunk, 
Rock Island, Illinois Central, Union Pacific, 
etc., are covered with magnesia lagging, 
which is a commercial product made of about 
ninety parts of carbonate of magnesium, and 
ten parts of fine, silky asbestos fibre. This 
mixture is pressed into blocks, and these 
are fashioned to fit the boilers of the ordi- 
nary locomotives instead of the wood lag- 
ging formerly used, and the magnesia, after 
being applied, is then covered with plan- 
ished sheet iron. The large number of 
locomotives built for use upon the Trans- 
Siberian Railway are covered with these 
blocks from the laboratory of the Keasbey 



& Mattison Company, as are also a large 
number in use in China, Brazil, Australia 
and various other well-known but remote 
corners of the world. The war vessels of 
the United States Navy, the " Philadelphia," 
"New York," "Yorktown," "Benning- 
ton," " Miantonomah," " Charleston," 
"Baltimore," "Brooklyn," "Newark," 
"Massachusetts," the so-called "pirate," 
the armored "Columbia," and its sister 
ship, the "Minneapolis," etc., as well as 
the dynamite cruiser "Vesuvius," all have 
their boilers, steam pipes and other radiating 
surfaces covered with magnesia from this 
Ambler plant. The scene of the present 
troubles in the Transvaal, South Africa, is 
liberally sprinkled with Keasbey & Matti- 
son' s magnesia covering, as are also the ore 
mines of Spain and Japan, the silver mines 
of Mexico and Bolivia, as well as the sugar 
reduction houses upon the plantations of 
Cuba, Hawaii and Louisiana. 

It is as the manufacturers of Bromo Caf- 
feine, however, that the Keasbey & Mattison 
Company have become most widely known 
among the trade. There is probably no 
other preparation which has been so widely 
imitated as has been Bromo Caffeine. In 
the line of pharmaceuticals the Keasbey & 
Mattison granulated effervescent salts are 
probably more widely known than those of 
any other makers. 

The Keasbey & Mattison Company, which 
was formed in 1892, has a capital stock ot 
$2,000,000, and Dr. Richard V. Mattison, 
who has always been the managing partner 
of the business since its foundation, is the 
President and general manager of the com- 
pany. 



Class flews. 



SECOND YEAR CLASS NOTES. 

Stoudt will gladly receive suggestions 

and remedies. Kindly leave them at the 
office. 



Sol! Sol!! Sol!! ! 

The subject of hair restoratives em- 
barrasses many members of the class, but 
oddly enough, the latter occupy back seats. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, 1900. 



CLASS XEWS. 



39 



A diamond pin has been found, and 

in a few weeks the members of the class will 
each have one. ('oi's turn to call the bluff !) 

The Mandolin, Guitar and Glee Club 

is now well organized, and will soon be 
ready for active work. Clear the track when 
the bell rings ! 

Our "pledges" when put on the 

Bulletin Board of the College seem to have 
a most alarming effect on our Senior friends. 
What can the matter be, that there should 
such a clatter be ! 

At the Beta Phi meeting on January 

29, the resignation of J. H. Levering was 
accepted with much regret. Otto S. Kraus 
was elected his successor, and the selection 
is a most popular one. 

The class of 1901 has been very much 

interested in a course of lectures by Pro- 
fessor Lowe on Inorganic Materia Medica. 
The lectures were very instructive and 
thoroughly appreciated. 

The results of J. P. Wolfinger's efforts 

are most gratifying to the class. Those who 
were present at the meeting on January' 29 ex- 
pressed their admiration of the product ex- 
hibited, and those who were not present will 
have an opportunity to see it shortly. 

Edwin M. Murphy has his own ideas 

of drugs. He often remarks, "You may 
call such and such a drug by such and such 
a name up North, but that is not what we 
call it down South." With Edwin a local 
drug name for an official drug name is " the 
same old coon." 

The Remington Club, which was or- 
ganized the first of last year, met Januar\ 
10 and selected the following officers for tlie 
following year : 

President — H. M. Highfield. 

\'ice-President — T. W. Penrose. 

Secretary — X. C. Michels. 

Treasurer — E. F. W. Garber. 

The Century Club, at its meeting 



Secretary, C. Harry Ziegler ; Treasurer, 
Robert N. Bell. 

The purpose of the Club is the advance- 
ment of the knowledge of its members, 
particularly upon the subjects taught at the 
College. 

On January 15, the Beta Phi Society 

had one of the most enjoyable meetings since 
its organization. About 100 members of the 
class were present. After a short business 
session the rest of the time was given to a 
programme arranged by the Entertainment 
Committee. 

The first number was a piano solo, by 
Theodore K. Boesch, followed by a poem, 
"The Class '01," by Fielding O. Lewis. 
Then a selection was rendered b}' a quar- 
tette, composed of T. K. Boesch, W. F. 
Steever, Y. C. Michels and E. F. \\\ Gar- 
ber. 

By the rounds of applause that greeted 
each number we judge that thej' were all 
heartily enjoyed. 

A programme has been arranged for the 
meeting of February 12, 1900. 

E.\RL H. Cone, 
E. F. W. Garber, 
Beta Phi Reporters. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS NOTES. 

Rumor has it, "The High School 

Girls " are color blind. 

Except in stature, Whitman is a 



January 30, 1900, elected the following offi- 
cers for the year : President, John B. Tingle; 



"dead ringer " for Hughey Dougherty. 

Mr. Eddy's talk at the last Zeta Phi 

Meeting was both interesting and instruc- 
tive. 

Stinson says Lehman is thinking 

about an armor to ward off cupid's arrows. 
How about Stinson ? 

Any person having " wedding cake " 

scraps will kindly send them to Schad, for 
dreaming purposes. He's a winner. 

Here is a yell from the sunny South : 

" Whitall ! Whitall ! Tatum T, 
Chocolate ! Chocolate ! Pharmacy !" 



40 



CLASS NEWS. 



A L UMNI REPOR 7 , 
FEBRUARY, ir^oo. 



The worthy bachelors are seriously 

thinking of framing a set of resolutions and 
striking Meredith's name from the list. 

We are glad to state that M. L. Branin, 

manager of our undefeated foot-ball team, 
is convalescing from an attack of typhoid 
fever. 

Upon the arrival of the party at Cam- 
den in the evening, Captain Young was 
seen seeking for a physician ; cause, too 
much Millville pie. 

" I love you, oh !" That sly glance 

of the half-closed eye. That cosy down- 
ward bend of the head, oh ! Ask Eddy 
for the significance. 

Congratulations are pouring in upon 

Mr. Wilkinson, President of the Doolittle 
Club, concerning the said club upon its for- 
mation at dress parade. 



McClure, accompanied by one of the 

fair sex, was cutting the figure 8 and inci- 
dentally a few stars (?) on Centennial Lake 
during the recent good skating. 

Thos. C. Corson, Class of 'oo, re- 
ceived the highest average in the recent ex- 
aminations before the Pennsylvania State 
Pharmaceutical Examining Board, and 
another member of our Class, Frank J. 
Maier, made loo per cent, before the New 
Jersey Pharmaceutical Examining Board. 

ATRIP TO THE GLASS FACTORIES OF 

WHITALL, TATUM & CO., AT 

MILLVILLE, N. J. 

Wednesday, January 31, 1900, will ever 
be cherished in the minds of the members 
of '00 class of the P.C.P. as "a red-letter 
day." One and all had been looking for- 
ward to this trip, and the "one man" that 
Professor Remington predicted would make 
a mistake and get aboard a Chestnut Street 
ferry boat, discovered his mistake before he 
arrived at Kaighn's Point, and fortunately, he 
"fell in" with Irby, from Gloucester, and 
together they journeyed toward the town 



that was not on the map — Camden. With 
this one exception the rest of the class, re- 
membering Professor Remington's instruc- 
tions, took passage on a Market Street ferry 
boat, and arrived at their destination without 
further incident. 

The "special cars" were soon taken 
possession of, and once in them the boys 
began to realize that it was about time to 
give vent to their ' ' pent-up enthusiasm ' ' by 
" whooping-er-up " for Whitall, Tatum & 
Co. 

To amuse themselves, the occupants of the 
first car generally played ' ' Seven up, ' ' ' 'Old 
Maids," and other well-known games. In 
the rear car a high-class vaudeville was be- 
ing enacted; a "four-round" go, with Meuser 
as one of the principals, was also one of the 
attractions. 

As we neared Millville the class was 
divided into diflferent sections, each section 
being designated by its different colored 
badge. For instance, the high school girls 
had red and white. Upon arriving at Mill- 
ville part of the class visited the factories at 
Claytown or Upper Millville, while the other 
portion visited Glasstown or Lower Millville. 
At about noon all hands repaired to the 
W. C. T. U. Hall, where a bountiful repast 
had been spread. Immediately before par- 
taking of the many delicacies, Stinson Whit- 
man, Pop Heckman, Kelly and Scottie 
endeavored to amuse the populace by a lit- 
tle comic opera, but the curtain was soon 
rung down when the dinner bell rang. 
Ever^'body did justice to the ' ' good things ' ' 
set before them, and Schad for once secured 
enough to eat. Then came cigars and the 
after-dinner speeches ; certainly we all knew 
Professor Remington's reputation as an after- 
dinner speaker, but we were agreeably sur- 
prised at the large number of ' ' Chauncey 
Depews ' ' that the class contained, namely, 
Meredith, Seip, Blue and Eddy. Mr. Bacon, 
Whitall, Tatum & Co.'s representative, is 
also in Class A when talking after partaking 
of a good dinner. The class now proceeded 
to get more pointers in the art of glass-mak- 
ing. The section which had visited Clay- 



ALUMNI REPORT, 

FEBRUARY, 1900. 



ITEMS. 



41 



town in the morning went to Glasstown in 
the afternoon, and vice versa. Every one so 
inclined was given the opportunity to try 
' ' their wind ' ' at blowing glass, and at about 
4.30 P.M. we left Millville with a lot of good, 



solid information and kind thoughts for 

Whitall, Tatum & Co. 

Robert C. Pursel, 
Walter Brooks, 

Zeta Phi Reporters. 



IFtems- 



The Franklin Institute, of Philadelphia, 

held its seventy-fifth annual meeting on 
January 17, 1900, which, by the by, was the 
one hundred and ninety-fourth anniversary 
of the birth of Benjamin Franklin, for whom 
the institution was named. This time-hon- 
ored institution is known for its good works 
the world over, and deserves the richest 
measure of prosperity. Quite a number of 
those who are active in the work of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy are also 
active in that of the Franklin Institute, such 
as Prof Samuel P. Sadtler, Charles Bullock, 
George M. Beringer, Lyman F. Kebler, W. 
E. Ridenour and others. What the Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy has been in 
the development of American pharmacy the 
Franklin Institute has been in the develop- 
ment of American invention — pre-eminent. 

The Committee on Coinage, Weights 

and Measures of the House of Representa- 
tives is again considering the subject of the 
adoption of the metric system of weights 
and measures as the legal system of the 
United States — with a view of presenting a 
report to Congress upon this subject. The 
Chairman of the Special Committee on 
Weights and Measures of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association would urge all 
members of the Association and all pharma- 
cists of the United States who favor the 
adoption of the measure to write to the 
Hon. James H. Southard, Chairman of the 
House Committee, Washington, D. C, pre- 
senting their views upon this subject. Prob- 
ably no class of persons would be more bene- 
fited by the adoption of this measure than 
the pharmacists of this country, hampered 
and annoyed as they now are by being 



compelled to use avoirdupois and apothe- 
caries' weight, wine measure and, in some 
sections, imperial measure as well as the 
metric system. Since the foundation of the 
Republic there probably has never been a 
time when the importance of this subject 
was more apparent than it is at present. 
With the acquirement of new territory in 
distant parts of the world and the increase 
of our commerce with foreign nations, a 
universal system of weights and measures 
becomes more than ever desirable. Phar- 
macists of the United States are to be con- 
gratulated on the advanced position they 
have taken in securing the adoption of the 
metric system exclusively by the United 
States Pharmacopoeia in 1890, and it is 
hoped that they will continue to aid in se- 
curing its adoption by Congress as the only 
legal system of weights and measures in 
the United States. 

Report of meeting of the Philadelphia 

Association of Retail Druggists held Febru- 
ary 2, 1900 : 

Sixty retail druggists assembled in the 
Museum of the Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy to attend the meeting held on the 2d 
inst. 

All members are paying their dues 
promptly and taking unusual interest in the 
affairs of the Association. 

The Secretary reported that he had re- 
ceived from H. C. Blair, Jr., a check for 
$10, which had been donated by Messrs. 
Whitall, Tatum & Co. to the Association. 

The resignation of L. F. Segrest was ac- 
cepted, on account of his retirement from 
business. 

D. M. Harris, Chairman of Entertainment 



42 



ITEMS. 



ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEBRUARY, jgoo. 



Committee, gave a concise and clear state- 
ment of the work accomplished by his Com- 
mittee and of the success they were having 
in getting up the progressive euchre for 
February 7, at Horticultural Hall ; con- 
cluding, Mr. Harris said that they were in- 
debted to Messrs. Smith, Kline & French 
Company for their liberality in giving the 
first ladies' and gentlemen's prize, and also, 
that the success of the affair was in a great 
measure due to the untiring work of C. H. 
Campbell, the Secretary of the Committee. 

C. H. Campbell and E. J. Finnerty, Jr., 
also spoke briefly for the Committee. 

J. C. Perry, Chairman of Executive Com- 
mittee, reported twenty-five new members; 
also, that a list of the approved jobbers in 
Philadelphia had been forwarded to National 
Secretary Thos. V. Wooten, as follows : 
(i) Aschenbach & Miller, W. R.* 

(2) Butterworth & Co., C. H., W. R. 

(3) Lambert & Kirk. 

(4) Philadelphia Wholesale Drug Com- 
pany, Ltd. 

(5) Pile & Sons, W. H. 

(6) Pfroom & Kindig, W. R. 

(7) Shoemaker & Busch. 

(8) Shoemaker & Co., Robt., W. R. 

(9) Smith, Kline & French Company. 

(10) Smith & Co., V. H., W-. R. 

(11) Steelman & Archer, W. R. 

(12) Warner & Co., W. R., W. R. 

The renewal of the Treasurer's bond was 
brought up,, the premium being $7.50. It 
was thought that this could be had for a much 
cheaper rate, and on motion of J. C. Perry, 
which was adopted, it was referred to the 
Finance Committee to report at next meet- 
ing. 

Bills amounting to $15. 01 were presented 
and ordered paid. 

C. H. Campbell presented the Association 
with a letter press, and the Chair personally 
thanked him for the donation. 

The following resolution was then read by 
J. C. Perry, and passed : 



*W. R. — Doing both a wholesale and retail busi- 
ness. 



''Resolved, That the Philadelphia Associa- 
tion of Retail Druggists will recognize any 
action and will support all measures pro- 
posed by the National Executive Committee, 
providing we have the support of both the 
Proprietary Association of America and the 
National Wholesale Druggists' Associa- 
tion." 

Attention was called to recent prosecutions 
of retail druggists by the Sabbath Association 
and on motion of C. H. Campbell, it was 
agreed that the Association would stand by 
any member that action was taken against, 
the expense so incurred to be borne by 
assessment or voluntary contributions. 

C. H. Campbell read a communication 
from Fred'k T. Gordon, apothecary. League 
Island Navy Yard, in which he says that he 
is willing to devote some of his time in an 
endeavor to increase membership in the P. 
A. R. D., and to interest as many retail 
druggists as possible in the work. He does 
not ask for any compensation, only that such 
expenses as car fare, postage, etc., be paid 
by the Association. Mr. Gordon's letter 
concludes with the following : 

" My motive is to do all the good I can to 
put the druggist and my profession where 
both of right belong — at the top of the 
heap ! " 

It was agreed, with a rising vote of thanks, 
to accept Mr. Gordon's offer. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned. 

The next meeting will be held Friday, 
March 2, 1900, 3 p.m., at the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy, 145 North Tenth 
Street. See notice in another part of the 
Alumni Report. W. A. Rumsey, 

Secretary. 

P. S. — The following Committees have 
been appointed : 

Finance. — Dr. Chas. A. Weidemann ; J. 
L. Crothers ; B. Frank Davis ; W. F. Stein- 
metz. 

Auditing. — E. M. Boring ; J. S. Sands ; 
D. H. Ross; M. G. Ruff; Wm. Pechin. 

ReceptioTi. — Robert McNeil ; Wallace 
Procter ; S. C. Henry ; J. J. Finney ; C. A. 
Gill. 



ALUMNI REPORT, •.: 

FEBRUARY, i^oo. 

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A HAyDSCVIG PHOTO FOLDER IX EACH 5c. PACKAGE 

RARER BOXXLE-CARS 

AMERICAN KIND 

One gross, one color in a box, or 
one gross, five colors in a box 

Printed, 10 Cents a gross extra 




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ALUMNI REPORT, 
FEIiRUARY, T900. 



Drug Stores for Sale 



Druggists' stocks and fixtures 

appraised. Call, see and examine 

a large list of desirable stores — 

Information free to callers. Send stamped envelope with 



some suitable for physicians 
inquiries by mail. 

hong-Mstahlished Transfer Agency. References: Many of the Wholesale and 
Retail Druggists of Philadelphia and elsewhere. 

OFFICE DAYS 



MONDAY, WEDNESDAY and FRIDAY 
9 A.M. to 3 P.M. 



Daniel Phreaner, 

147 N. Twelfth Street 



Bullock & Crenshaw 

528 Archi St., PhiiladelphLia 

CHEIHICALS AND 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS 

FULL, LABOKATOKY OUTFITS 
SOLE AGENTS FOR DREVERHOFF'S SAXON FII-TER PAPERS 
BOHEMIAN GLASSWARE. BISHOP & CO.'S PLATINUM WARS 

AGENTS FOR MARQUART'S CHEMICALS 

BAKER & ADAM SON'S CHEMICALS 
Catalogues mailed on receipt of 10 cents for postage 




ESTABLISHED 1840. 





HENRY TROEMNER 

MAKER OF 

Fine Scales and Weights 

PRICE-LIST ON APPLICATION. 

Troemner's Scales are used exclusively 
by all the U. S. Mints, Treasury Depart- 
ments and in the Army and Naval Hospitals. 

710 MARKET STREET, PHILADELPHIA. 

JOSEPH ZENTMAYER ^^ 

Optician 

Hanufacturer of 

Microscopes, Slides, Covers, Glass and Mounting Material, 
Spectacles and Eye-Q lasses 

Developing and Printing for Amateur Photographers 

209 S. ELEVENTH ST., PHILADELPHIA 

We Repair all Instruments of Precision. Special Attention 
Given to Oculists' Prescriptions. Catalogues on application. 




A L UMiWI REP OR T, j „ 

FEBR UA R Y, 1900. 



Soluble Powder=Capsules 




or, Capsuled-Powders are a new and novel form of presenting medi- 
cines. They contain the various substances either in a wholly original 
state — always finely powdered — or as in the instance of drugs, 
recently powdered, and in the most efficient and natural condition 
for administration. Thus a desideratum long^ desired has been attained. 
There is no previous preparation made necessary, as in other forms 
of medicine — notably gelatine= and sugar=coated pills — no cohesive 
or excipient is required or used. The materials of medicines are 
simply enclosed in a pliant, soft, soluble gelatine capsule, quickly 
solved in the warmth and fluids of the body, presenting no such 
objectionable resistance as the ordinary double-cased, hard, gelatine 
capsule. In addition to this brief description, an inspection will at 
once impress the judgment. Physicians and pharmacists are urged to 
examine these products. 

The following embraces a small number of popular and approved 
remedies which we now offer in the new form of Powder-Capsules. 

QUININE SULPHATE, QUININE BISULPHATE, BLAUD, 
ANIMAL DIASTASE (Amylopsin), ACETANILID and its Compounds, 
RHUBARB, ANTIPYRINE, PHENACETINE, SALOL, 

ANTIPYRETICS, MIGRAINE, Nos. I and 2. 

These include all this class of products, singly and all the (AcetanUid, Caffeine, Camphor Monobrom). 

most efficient compounds. 



SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. WRITE FOR LITERATURE. 



JOHN WYETH 

F. H. WYET 

E. T. DOB 



i;,3 John Wyeth & Bro. 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



X ALUMNI REPORT, 

FEBRUARY, 1900. 

WM. H. BROWN & BRO.'S 

QUADRUPLE EXTRACTS 

SNOW VIOLET 

PEARLS-OF-VIOLETS 

PEARLS-OF-ROSES 
PEARLS-OF-LILIES 
CARNATION PINK 

ORCHARD BLOSSOMS 
HELIOTROPE BLOSSOMS 
WHITE ROSE BUDS 
MARGUERITE 

PRICE LIST AND SAMPLE VIALS MAILED ON APPLICATION 

OUR GENUINE VIOLET WATER 
EAU DE TOILETTE PEARLS -OF- VIOLETS 

PRE-EMINENTLY THE TOILET REQUISITES OF AMERICA 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO SEE OUR 
EXQUISITE 

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YOUR CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 



WM. H. BROWN & BRO.'S PERFUMES 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Tv^o Desirable Glass Syringes 






J^-OUNCE CAPACITY 

3Iade with Rubber Washers or Packiusr 



These Syringes will not leak, are much cheaper than Hard Rubber, and can be kept cleaner. 

No. 37, with Soft Rubber Tip, dozen in a box dozen, ^0.75 

" " " " " each in wood case " .85 

No. 219, Glass Conical Point, dozen in a box " .50 

" " " " each in wood case " .60 



JOHN M. MARIS & CO. 

Philadelphia New York 



The Chocolate That Draws Crowds 



^*^'^' 



y^^f^ h' ill/' . Ld^'^ 





Is the Kind to Sene at your Soda Fountain 

The unequalled magnetic power of the " H. B. & W." Chocolate, known universally as 
' ' Koko," is due to qualities which render it superlatively suitable for serving with soda water. 

(ij Its strength and fineness of flavor. 

None but ripe cocoa beans of nrst quality are nsed in its preparation, and nothing bat 
beans, no sugar mixed in or powdered cocoa shells. 

(2) Its freedom from cocoa butter. 

Does not grease the glasses or leave a disagreeable furry taste in the drinker's month. 

"Koko " lends itself readily to syrup making, is perfectly smooth and soloble and will 
rapidly build up and firmly retain a trade that comes esp^ially for chocolate. Pnt np in i lb., 
5 lb., lo lb. and 25 lb. screw-cap tin canisters. 

THE 

*'H. B. & W." Pure Concentrated Fruit Syrups 

The quality of these goods is superb. Syrups as Sue are not to be had anywhere else ; 
finer syrups simply cannot be made. They represent perfectly the very choicest fr-it cf the 
greatest fruit market in the world — Philadelphia. For fountain use they may be diluted with 
from two to four parts of simple or rock-candy syrup. 



Alaska Snowball 

Ambrosia 
*Apricot 

Arctic Sherbet 
*Banana 
•Blackberry 
* Black Raspberry 
*Blood Orange 
•Calisaya Phosphate 
♦Celery' and Orange Phosphate 
•CHERRY RIPE 
*Cherry (Morella) 



Claret Phosphate 

Coffee 
•Emit Phosphates 

Ginger 

Ginger Aie 

•Grape ■Unfernieiite'd 
«Grape (Wild > 
•Imperial Sidlv Lemcn 

LEMOX 
•Lime 
•Morella Cherry Phosphate 

Nectar 



Nectarine Fhospfaate 

ORANGE 
♦ORANGEADE 
♦Orange Phosphate 
•Peach 
•Pear 
♦Pineapple 
♦Plnm 
•Quince 
♦Raspberry 
♦Sa£^>berTy Phosphate 
♦Ra^berry Vinegar 



•RedCnrrant 

♦RBD 3CBSSIHA ORANGB 

Soot Beer 

SarsapaxSIa 

Sberbet 

Sherbet. IVisiJii 
♦Sicily Lemon Phosphate 
•Strawberry 

Vanilla 
♦Wild Cherry Phosphate 
♦"L. A.W." 



Flavors, names of which are marked with an asterisk, are also supplied as Frtiit Juices. 
Concentrated Syrups put up in i-gallon jugs, packed 6 in a case ; Fruit Juices in qoaxt 
champagne bottles, packed 12 in a case. 



HANCE BROTHERS & WHITE 



Head Office and Works, Philadelphia 

(New York 59-61 Maiden Las; 
Chicago 195 East Randolph Street 

Pittslmrg 419 Se-^enth Avenue 
London SB 134 Soathwark Street 



Branch Office* 



Pharmaceutical Chemtsts 



1 '■' 



IT PAYS 

To Dispense Eairchild's 

When Essence ofPepsine is prescribed. 

Fairchild's Essehce/gmesjheusuit^ 

the prescriber anticipates, anil keeps- your 
customers trade, 

Fairchild Bros. 8 Foster. 



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